Tooth and Claw – 4*

Tooth and Claw by Jo Walton

I bought this book because someone described it to me as Pride and Prejudice with dragons and since I love both of those things it sounded exceptionally appealing.

Going into this book you need to have more suspension of disbelief than usual when dealing with fantasy elements, largely because the visual of massive dragons (the sizes described in the book of some of them are really large) dancing, wearing hats and going to church is incredibly strange and somewhat hard to picture.

Bearing that in mind this is a very enjoyable book that creates a very interesting society that bears at least a superficial resemblance to the world of Jane Austen. I would say that it is deficient in one aspect that to me is very important in regards to Jane Austen’s work, there isn’t much satire of society contained within the book, which is a shame but I guess that wasn’t the story the author wished to tell.

The story follows the lives of several dragons from the same family dealing with the aftermath of the death of their father. We get to see the perspectives of several characters and they are done well, with each having clear personalities and desires that are separate from each other.

The society these characters are in is quite sexist though I would have liked a bit more of a delve into some of the issues the author touches on. There are hints of domestic abuse and a somewhat more detailed look at the notion of “purity” and it’s grip on the view of women in that society. There are clear allegories here and some definite links to real world issues but I guess I felt that the presentation was a little too hands off in places where I would have liked to see more impact and personal response.

Even then I did thoroughly enjoy the book which kept a mostly Austen feel for the whole length of it and it was certainly a unique and unusual concept for a story and that was incredibly refreshing.

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms – 4*

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin.

We did this one for our Science-Fiction and Fantasy book club. It caused some interesting debate, seems to be one of those books people either really love or they hate.

Personally I really enjoyed it quite a lot, I also own The Fifth Season, but I haven’t started reading that yet (it’s the series she won the Hugo awards for) and I am now very much looking forward to sinking my teeth into it.

This is her first novel I believe, and as such I do forgive it quite a bit because obviously the first time someone is learning what works and what doesn’t and their work is unlikely to be perfect and polished. There are some definite flaws to the book, the romance is a little weird, though no weirder than many supernatural romances to be fair. There is a particular description in regards to a sex scene I won’t put here, but that did make me chuckle quite a bit.

Overall though it’s a story that goes in unexpected directions at times and I really liked that. Often the protagonist of a tale does everything right, or things just happen to end up going their way, often in a typical and choreographed fashion and that just wasn’t the case here.

The main character could do with some more exploration of what it is to be her, perhaps a little more agency in places, but overall I found it an interesting look at what someone who is wholly unprepared for the position she is thrust into does to deal with all of that, especially when she is relatively young and inexperienced with politics.

The setting was something I found particularly striking. I love mythologies and have been reading myths and legends from all over the world since I was a very small child (though the earliest ones I read were heavily sanitised versions of them) so the mythological aspect of the world building particularly appealed, with all of the stuff about the gods being some of my favourite parts of the book.

I don’t want to go into spoiler laden territory, I will say that aspects of the ending are telegraphed quite strongly in the book, perhaps a little too heavily in places where it might have been better to do more show than tell, but I didn’t find that it ruined the story for me (though it was a sticking point for other members of our book group). The ending itself surprised me in some ways given that it is a trilogy and I am curious about where the story is going from here, but I enjoyed the book enough that I will pick the others up at some point and find out.

Overall I personally recommend it, it’s a fun read with an interesting world and it’s good to see more books with diverse voices doing well in the world.

 

The Hate U Give – 5*

The Hate U Give (THUG) by Angie Thomas

So this is a break from my usual Fantasy and Science-Fiction reads, but I have been wanting to read this book since I first read about it and with the film coming up soon I bumped it up my reading list so I could read it before I see the adaptation.

Firstly I want to say that the fictional take on a subject which I seem to read about more and more is not an easy read, but it is definitely worth reading. I am white, I am British, the experiences in this book are pretty far from mine. I have read about various police shootings in America, I have even read things about police violence in Britain too, but it’s not something I am likely to experience first hand but that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try and understand it.

I think it’s really important to read the stories of people with experiences you will never have and this was a powerful one. It’s easy to judge situations from the outside of them. To fail to understand why poverty and oppression can make entire communities places of rage and pain. I’ve never had to be afraid of the Police, I’ve never had to be afraid of people in my own neighbourhood but this book gave me a window into the lives of people for whom that sort of thing is a painful reality.

The story deals with the shooting of a young, unarmed black man from the perspective of the young woman who was his friend and companion at the time. It shows you her life, the life of people in her family and how what unfolds affects them and their wider community.

I saw a review of this book on Goodreads where a white guy had a massive rant because at one point in the book one of the characters makes a comment to a white character about how he cannot really understand their experiences and how this was massively racist and unfair.

Look, fellow white people. I get that hearing people who are oppressed rag on your skin colour in general can hurt your feelings and make you defensive. If you are male and straight then it is likely that you have never really had the sort of experiences that generate this sort of rage and no, that is not your fault, but also remember that the rage isn’t really directed at you, but at institutions that you benefit from without realising it.

I get that angry about feminist issues for similar reasons, so whilst I have not experienced racism and oppression related to it, I do know what it feels like to walk the world as a woman and to have to deal with that set of issues. Different experiences but the rage is very similar.

So please, give this book a chance. Not just that, read widely into the subject matter of police shootings. Don’t just assume the person shot did something to deserve it, to cause it. Don’t dismiss the pain and rage of the communities where this keeps happening. Listen to them, really listen and then ask how you can help and do what they say.

I am tired of this world not being as wonderful as I know it can be. I am tired of us treating each other like shit for arbitrary differences that we have no control over (you can control your opinions so please don’t assume I mean it’s OK to be a bigot, it’s not).

Read this book, watch the film, learn and then act on that and maybe, just maybe we can all do a little something to stop this shit from happening.