Wayfarers Series (5* overall)

Books: The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, A Closed and Common Orbit, and Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

So as I am going to WorldCon I get to vote in the Hugos! This is very exciting to me as it’s my first WorldCon and I have not done voting like this as well so I am doing a lot of reading for it.

To start with I am reading my way through the Best Novel category and since I have already read all of the Becky Chambers books I thought I would start things off my catching up on some outstanding reviews as part of all of this. Since the series is up for an award along with the third book it seemed a good start to do all of them at once.

long wayThe Long Way to a Small Angry Planet (5*)

“Do not judge other species by your own social norms”

The plot of the book follows the crew of a ship whose job it is to help create what are basically wormholes between two points in space. To do so there needs to be two points to make one between and then the ship has to punch through to create it, but they need to punch from the destination and since that doesn’t already have a way to get there quickly they need to go the long way to the planet (hence the name of the book).

It should be said that the plot is not really the main point of the book, the book is made on the characters and the interactions between them. The setting is really detailed and well thought out and you learn about it through the characters learning about each other. I love the diverity of voices in the characters and how relatable a lot of them seem to be (even if you don’t like them).

Honestly this book felt like a warm hug to me, the characters ended up feeling like good friends and I cared what happened to them throughout the story. There is adversity and disaster in this book and it’s generally used as a means to drive the character’s stories and relationships rather than the plot itself necessarily being something you overly care about (it’s just not the focus of the story).

I think the only thing that saddens you about going on from the end of the book is finding out that the rest of the series follows different people so you don’t get to see more of their lives. This book sucks you in, fills you with all of the emotions and leaves you desperately wanting to read more.

common orbitA Closed and Common Orbit (4*)

“Perhaps the ache of homesickness was a fair price to pay for having so many good people in her life.” 

The second book follows Lovelace, an AI who we met in book one and her friend Pepper (who appears briefly in book one as well). Lovelace (or Lovey) is trying to adjust to her new life and Pepper is doing her best to help. The book also gives us flashbacks into Pepper’s past and how she got to where she is now and why helping Lovey is so important to her.

One of the things I loved about this book was it’s focus on relationships was were not sexual. Pepper seems to have a QPF with the person she is living with and there is never any real sign that Lovey is interested in much other than perhaps romantic relationships and as an asexual this sort of representation is often meaningful.

I could have a small gripe about how AIs are one of the typical things used to show asexuality and how that can be a negative thing when non human representations are one of the only things you see, but this is done well and representation of all sorts of relationships are the core of these books so it does not feel like it was done with that sort of thing in mind so I enjoyed it a great deal.

Another excellent and heartwarming character driven story that perhaps didn’t quite tug on some strings the way the first one did, but overall is really quite excellent and I loved it.

spaceborn fewRecord of a Spaceborn Few (5*)

“From the ground, we stand. From our ships, we live. By the stars, we hope.” 

Now we come to the one up for a Hugo for best novel. This book follows a few specific inhabitants of one of the Earth colony ships that took them out into the stars and whilst many humans have moved on elsewhere to colonies and other worlds, some have stayed on the ships to try and retain the culture that they developed on their long journey in space.

Like the first book this one follows a group of people so we see far more perspectives than the second book and honestly it seems to be something of a strength that Becky has in weaving those narratives together in interesting ways, especially in this case when the people do not have the tight interconnectedness of being on the same ship and some of them are far more loosely connected.

Still, she shows us a fascinating culture that has developed on these colony ships and how the people left on them are trying to keep the old traditions going whilst dealing with the fact that many people leave to go elsewhere and they sometimes feel more and more obsolete.

I was absolutely swept up into their lives and I felt so much for them in their individual troubles and hurts, which is where she excels. You weep with these people, you love with them, feel joy with them and that is a beautiful thing to inspire in a reader.

I am not sure if she is going to write more books in this setting, but even if she doesn’t I look forward to seeing what she comes up with in the future so I can fall in love and be heartbroken for a whole new set of characters.

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