The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms – 4*

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin.

We did this one for our Science-Fiction and Fantasy book club. It caused some interesting debate, seems to be one of those books people either really love or they hate.

Personally I really enjoyed it quite a lot, I also own The Fifth Season, but I haven’t started reading that yet (it’s the series she won the Hugo awards for) and I am now very much looking forward to sinking my teeth into it.

This is her first novel I believe, and as such I do forgive it quite a bit because obviously the first time someone is learning what works and what doesn’t and their work is unlikely to be perfect and polished. There are some definite flaws to the book, the romance is a little weird, though no weirder than many supernatural romances to be fair. There is a particular description in regards to a sex scene I won’t put here, but that did make me chuckle quite a bit.

Overall though it’s a story that goes in unexpected directions at times and I really liked that. Often the protagonist of a tale does everything right, or things just happen to end up going their way, often in a typical and choreographed fashion and that just wasn’t the case here.

The main character could do with some more exploration of what it is to be her, perhaps a little more agency in places, but overall I found it an interesting look at what someone who is wholly unprepared for the position she is thrust into does to deal with all of that, especially when she is relatively young and inexperienced with politics.

The setting was something I found particularly striking. I love mythologies and have been reading myths and legends from all over the world since I was a very small child (though the earliest ones I read were heavily sanitised versions of them) so the mythological aspect of the world building particularly appealed, with all of the stuff about the gods being some of my favourite parts of the book.

I don’t want to go into spoiler laden territory, I will say that aspects of the ending are telegraphed quite strongly in the book, perhaps a little too heavily in places where it might have been better to do more show than tell, but I didn’t find that it ruined the story for me (though it was a sticking point for other members of our book group). The ending itself surprised me in some ways given that it is a trilogy and I am curious about where the story is going from here, but I enjoyed the book enough that I will pick the others up at some point and find out.

Overall I personally recommend it, it’s a fun read with an interesting world and it’s good to see more books with diverse voices doing well in the world.

 

The Hate U Give – 5*

The Hate U Give (THUG) by Angie Thomas

So this is a break from my usual Fantasy and Science-Fiction reads, but I have been wanting to read this book since I first read about it and with the film coming up soon I bumped it up my reading list so I could read it before I see the adaptation.

Firstly I want to say that the fictional take on a subject which I seem to read about more and more is not an easy read, but it is definitely worth reading. I am white, I am British, the experiences in this book are pretty far from mine. I have read about various police shootings in America, I have even read things about police violence in Britain too, but it’s not something I am likely to experience first hand but that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try and understand it.

I think it’s really important to read the stories of people with experiences you will never have and this was a powerful one. It’s easy to judge situations from the outside of them. To fail to understand why poverty and oppression can make entire communities places of rage and pain. I’ve never had to be afraid of the Police, I’ve never had to be afraid of people in my own neighbourhood but this book gave me a window into the lives of people for whom that sort of thing is a painful reality.

The story deals with the shooting of a young, unarmed black man from the perspective of the young woman who was his friend and companion at the time. It shows you her life, the life of people in her family and how what unfolds affects them and their wider community.

I saw a review of this book on Goodreads where a white guy had a massive rant because at one point in the book one of the characters makes a comment to a white character about how he cannot really understand their experiences and how this was massively racist and unfair.

Look, fellow white people. I get that hearing people who are oppressed rag on your skin colour in general can hurt your feelings and make you defensive. If you are male and straight then it is likely that you have never really had the sort of experiences that generate this sort of rage and no, that is not your fault, but also remember that the rage isn’t really directed at you, but at institutions that you benefit from without realising it.

I get that angry about feminist issues for similar reasons, so whilst I have not experienced racism and oppression related to it, I do know what it feels like to walk the world as a woman and to have to deal with that set of issues. Different experiences but the rage is very similar.

So please, give this book a chance. Not just that, read widely into the subject matter of police shootings. Don’t just assume the person shot did something to deserve it, to cause it. Don’t dismiss the pain and rage of the communities where this keeps happening. Listen to them, really listen and then ask how you can help and do what they say.

I am tired of this world not being as wonderful as I know it can be. I am tired of us treating each other like shit for arbitrary differences that we have no control over (you can control your opinions so please don’t assume I mean it’s OK to be a bigot, it’s not).

Read this book, watch the film, learn and then act on that and maybe, just maybe we can all do a little something to stop this shit from happening.

Guns of the Dawn – 5*

Guns of the Dawn by Adrian Tchaikovsky

There are some minor spoilers for the book in the review, but I have tried to keep them to a minimum.

I have read a couple of Adrian’s books already and when I started talking about how much I liked them I kept being told that I must read Guns of the Dawn. So I was in a bookshop and saw a copy (bonus, it was signed) and picked it up to read.

The basic premise is that one Kingdom is at war with it’s neighbouring country who are now a Republic after the murder of their King. The other country are invading and the draft has already called for almost every able-bodied man between 15 and 50 but it hasn’t been enough so a draft of women is called for.

The book follows Emily Marshwic as she joins the war and her experiences there, the choices she makes and how it affects her, those around her and her country as a whole.

I adored this book, it was very difficult to put down and an incredibly compelling read. One of the main things I loved about it is that Emily manages to be a very real person, which isn’t that common, in my experience, with female characters written by male authors, especially ones who could be seen to fit the Strong Female Character trope.

But Emily is allowed to be scared, to cry, to fuck things up and also to have her own sexuality and desires without being punished for them. She is allowed to have male and female friendships and even the romantic interests she has in the book doesn’t follow entirely expected paths.

There are a couple of incidents of attempted violence on her person that is not to do with war and that was a little frustrating, though not unexpected I suppose given the context of the book. My only real issue with it was that she manages so well to deal with her attackers, something that is hard to manage in reality, though not impossible of course. Still, in many ways I would rather have that than the alternative, so it’s only a minor quibble.

The depiction of war was done very well. It’s evocative of things I have read about a number of different wars, which I am sure was done on purpose. It’s also very unusual to have a fantasy book set in this sort of era, but I loved it for that as it meant that there was something very different about it. It also had interesting comments to make on a very split society, both along gender and class lines and the effects both of thoseĀ  have on someone’s life. In some ways her class gave Emily an advantage, even whilst her gender did not.

As mentioned before, Emily has both male and female friendships in the book and I really appreciated that. Too often the Strong Female Protagonist trope are basically surrounded by men entirely and you don’t get to see them much with other women. In this book the relationship between Emily and her two sisters is explored, along with other women she meets in the war and that was such a refreshing change.

Overall I thought it was very atmospheric, dealt with the subject matter well and sensitively and managed to create something both poignant and interesting to read without being too depressing and hopeless.

I shall add my voice to the many who already say that you should read this book for you should, it is excellent and well worth a look. I am struggling to decided whether or not I prefer this to Children of Time. In the end I think I shall say that they are two pretty different books and that I adore them both for very different reasons.