The Kingdom Of Copper (4*)

Book: The Kingdom of Copper by S A Chakraborty

This is book two of a trilogy, if you are curious about my views on the first book, City of Brass, click the link to have a read. You may be able to work out that I enjoyed it since I went as far as to pre-order the paperback of the second one. But if you haven’t read the first one in the series then this review is going to have some spoilers in it most likely so please be aware of that.

“I can count my short reign a success if I manage to convince the two most stubborn people in Daevabad to do something they don’t want to do.”

KoCRight, well this book picks up at first not too long after the events of the first book with Ali stranded in the desert and Nahri is in Daevabad dealing with the fallout of what happened.

It does then jump forward in time a few years when Alizayd is living with a tribe out in the desert and making a new life for himself while Nahri is making the most of her new life and her marriage to Ali’s brother.

Circumstances will drag Ali back to Daevabad, bringing him into conflict with most of his family and also with Nahri.

All of that will be threatened by a force in the north who will potentially cause permanent change to Daevanbad, even beyond the wildest dreams of either Ali or Nahri. All will come to a head during a big festival and the fate of Daevabad hangs in the balance.

So this book contains pretty much all the sorts of things I loved in the first one. The characters and their interactions are a main draw for this book so if they aren’t the sort of characters and dynamics you enjoy then this book will not really work for you, but I really loved it.

“People do not thrive under tyrants, Alizayd; they do not come up with innovations when they’re busy trying to stay alive, or offer creative ideas when error is punished by the hooves of a karkadann.”

The world that has been built is something that I really enjoy and the mythology it is based on is definitely something I wish I knew more about. The city and cultires of Daevabad feel very realistic and with the events in this book I felt like she took the tensions and issues that were established in the first book and really opened them up more . The author is really excellent at letting you see things from very different perspectives so you can see the roots of the conflict from a bit more of a neutral standpoint.

I am definitely very curious as to where the trilogy is going to end giving that there is another pretty big cliffhanger at the end of this one as well. I am sure whatever happens it’s going to be a hell of an emotional rollercoaster and I am here for it.

The City of Brass – 4*

Book: The City of Brass by S A Chakraborty.

This is a fascinating book based in middle eastern mythology I think, sadly it’s an area of mythology I don’t know much about so I can’t speak with any certainty on the matter. It’s a source of perpetual annoyance to me that I can get hundreds of books on Celtic, Norse, Greek or Roman mythology and very few on any other area of the world.

But anyway, enough of my personal gripes (though if anyone has any good recommendations for books on Myths and Legends by all means contact me!) This book follows a young woman called Nahri who grew up alone on the streets of Cairo and now makes a living as a conwoman, though she has some strange powers she does not really understand.

Her life is changed when she accidentally does magic and attracts the attention of a creature that seems to want to cause her harm and other that insists on taking her to the City of Brass, a place where all the Djinn/Daeva live.

It’s incredibly well written and carries you along with it into a strange world populated by powerful, yet somehow very human beings (who would loathe being referred to as being so). There are politics between factions in the city that are done very well and the relationships in general are excellent. One of the other things I love is how the book plays with the concepts of what is moral, what one faction thinks is good, another thinks is evil and you learn all the various motivations for them which makes it much harder to believe that any of them are entirely correct.

The only complaint I have about the book is that the ending is a bit too sudden. The rest of the book takes its time unfolding and it felt a bit to me that everything then happened all at once at the end and that was a shame because it meant that some of the elements felt more forced than they should have been.

It’s a pretty minor point though as the book is utterly gorgeous and had me on tenderhooks as to what was going to happen. I am currently greatly disappointed in myself for reading things only in paperback (I find kindles awkward and my joints won’t let me hold up most hardbacks without pain) as now I have to wait until the paperback is out and that is frankly going to be an agonising wait.